News from the Blog — Monday, December 5, 2016

In this blog we include items on giftedness, exceptionalities, parenting, education, and child development.

SAT ACCOMMODATIONS. The College Board, owner of the SAT and other standardized tests, will make it easier for students with disabilities to receive accommodations to take its tests. According to the College Board, "Beginning January 1, 2017, the vast majority of students who are approved for and using testing accommodations at their school through a current Individualized Education Program (IEP) or 504 Plan will have those same accommodations automatically approved for taking the SAT®, PSAT™10, PSAT/NMSQT®, SAT Subject Tests™, and AP®Exams." Find the press releaseFind a write-up in The Washington Post

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PARENTING STYLE. Psychology Today explains the results of a study of the link between parenting style and children's behavioral problems. According to Psychology Today, "The main finding was that children whose temperament is more “difficult” (they were easily upset, less able to self-regulate) both benefit more from positive parenting and suffer more from negative parenting." Is volatility or self-regulation an issue at your house? Read more

ADVOCATE! That's the verb form there, imperative mood, to be exact, and it's what the Council for Exceptional Children urges us to do: to "tell Congress to invest in education programs for children with exceptionalities now!" And you, dear reader, should be doubly motivated, seeing how that kiddo you raise or educate is multiply exceptional. Find out more about what CEC wants you to do. 

THE CHILD MIND INSTITUTE has published a parents' guide to OCD on its website, covering what it is, signs, treatment, related disorders, and working with school. Find the guide

ONLINE CBT FOR OCD. A recently-published study tested web-based cognitive behavioral therapy on adolescents with OCD. About 30 percent of treated subjects showed improvement effects ranging from moderate-large to very large. Commentary in Journal Watch, from the New England Journal of Medicine stated, "Study limitations included the lack of either an active Internet-based intervention or an in-person control group. If future studies are confirmatory, these positive findings will be especially important for children with OCD because multiple factors impede implementing in-person CBT." 

SENG WEBINAR. This Thursday, December 8, SENG offers a webinar titled "Communicating and Collaborating with Your Child's Teacher," to be presented by Dina Brulles. Find out more

AND THE DOE OCR? The Office of Civil Rights in the Department of Education sticks up for many students, occasionally for "our" students -- ones discriminated against because of a learning disability. The Atlantic has published an article in which experts speculate on whether the new president and his secretary of education will make changes that would affect the OCR. Find the article

GIFTED AND DISTRACTIBLE. This newsletter from With Understanding Comes Calm is out in its newest edition, with pointers to all kinds of resources and news. Find it

AND FINALLY, THIS. Be careful -- that toddler you're talking to might be better than you think at sensing pretend or statements that aren't true, according to a new study. Find out more.

Find all past blog entries at 2enewsletter.blogspot.com.